Risk-taking in Early Care and Learning Systems Design

Take Risks. We cannot afford not to. This was one of the many insights that stood out for me from conversations with Dr. Lynette Fraga, executive director of Child Care Aware of America, and Matthew Melmed, executive director of ZERO TO THREE, who visited the Permanent Fund and spoke at the Turrell Fund annual dinner in June. These national experts on early childhood confirmed what we already know at the Permanent Fund: we’re at a “tipping point in early childhood,” where positive, sustainable change is within reach if we stretch ourselves toward a vision for a thriving future Vermont.

These ideas emerged as most relevant to our work:

1) Think Big. “If we design an early care and learning system that addresses our needs today,” warned Dr. Fraga, “we’ll recreate the problems of today.” Instead, “let’s build a system that will work for our future children and families.” This advice is crucial at a moment when Building Bright Futures is launching a statewide process to design our future early care and learning system. As we think together about how to make high-quality, affordable early care and learning accessible to all Vermonters, let’s think beyond our current structures and dilemmas to imagine the best possible future. Let’s create a system that yields returns not only for today’s young children, but for their future families, business and communities.

2) Take Risks. We’ve invested billions in research on early learning outcomes in the U.S., Mr. Melmed explained. But, unlike our European counterparts, we haven’t yet applied that research into policy and practice. Our opportunity is to take what we know—that early care and learning is the most powerful long-term investment our society can make—and figure out how to do it, to capitalize on the potential of our children, now. This is not an easy task and the Permanent Fund’s timeline—high-quality, affordable early care and learning for Vermonters by 2025—requires significant innovation and leaves little room for error. However, Mr. Melmed and Dr. Fraga recommended using an iterative approach to innovation as a way of both taking risks and capturing feedback needed to course correct. Sometimes known as rapid-cycle testing, this approach enables testing solutions, documenting outcomes and adapting strategies quickly in response to emerging needs and findings.

An iterative approach also aligns well with the Permanent Fund’s strategy. That’s why we’ve built a highly productive, entrepreneurial organization that adapts quickly and yields top-of-line results. Our plan, in addition to building a movement of early childhood supporters and building lasting systems to support high-quality, affordable early care and learning, focuses on piloting new strategies for positive impact to ensure that our future system is as innovative and responsive as it must be so that Vermont children and families thrive in the decades to come.

3) Keep it up. Perhaps the most rewarding feedback from our visiting national experts was their recognition that our work is on the cutting edge of national early childhood efforts. Vermont is the ideal laboratory for scalable social change, Dr. Fraga and Mr. Melmed confirmed. “Many other places in the country don’t have the capacity for change or the ability to break down silos that you do here in Vermont,” Dr. Fraga pointed out. Vermont is small—only 6,000 babies born to Vermonters each year. Our strategy is focused—we’ve zeroed in on an ambitious but achievable goal of high-quality, affordable early care and learning for all Vermonters by 2025. Our forward-thinking political climate has achieved a history of doing things first. We are, in effect, “solution-sized” and poised to lead the nation on what scientists, economists, educators and politicians agree will yield the highest return on investment for our future: early care and education.

So, let’s do it! Let’s stick our necks out to achieve a big vision with even bigger rewards for children and families. Let’s solve an issue plaguing the nation by getting it right for Vermonters. How? Together. Here are just a few of the ways I hope you’ll consider jumping in:

I’m looking forward to making history together!

Best,

Aly